Friday, October 30, 2009

An afternoon with Julie Christie and Dirk Bogarde. Could have done without Dirk Baby. Ham? Yes, and then some

The Daily Mail is giving away a set of 'Hollywood Classic' films, i.e. tat which otherwise no one in their right mind would consider trying to sell. So on Wednesday, I wandered through to Promotions and grabbed myself several. At the moment I am lying in bed with 'flu-like symptoms' (it's not a cold, as I don't have a headache - I suspect it has something to do with those bloody statins) so I decided to watch one of them. I chose Darling because everyone talks about it, but having seen it, I wonder why. Christ, has it dated. And the script is by Frederic Raphael - he even won an Oscar for it - so every second line is a clever quotable quote. It also stars Dirk Bogarde who, in my opinion can't act his way out of a paper bag, always comes across as gay and should have stuck to light comedy. If you want to see some hilariously bad acting in a hilariously terrible film, watch Bogarde in Visconti's The Damned. He and it are truly awful. Who says homosexuals always have better taste. Darling is also pretty dire. At the time, it was daring and modern, but now it just comes over as facile and dated. Those of your interested in a little more pfgpowell bile might care to visit my IMDB review

2 comments:

  1. The tiny and ever so slightly gay John Fraser [(born Glasgow 18 March 1931) is a BAFTA-nominated Scottish-born actor of cinema, television and theatre] says it all in a link.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2004/oct/02/books.film

    This is merely a coincidence of trivia that I found earlier this afternon whilst checking the cast of The Dam Busters!

    ReplyDelete
  2. If you’ve made the link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2004/oct/02/books.film
    and read the content, you’ll realise that John Fraser’s autobiography is fairly dismissive of Laurence Harvey, who had a role in 'I Am a Camera', the movie. The critic William Kerr dismissed it with the phrase, 'Me no lika [Leica]?'
    Christopher Isherwood’s 1930's novels were later much better adapted into ‘Cabaret’, the musical.

    ReplyDelete